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It's why the concept of decentralized command that Willink and Babin used in the battlefield, in which they trusted that their junior officers were able to handle certain tasks without being monitored, translates so well to the business world.

Willink writes that he realized during his 20 years as a SEAL that, "Just as discipline and freedom are opposing forces that must be balanced, leadership requires finding the equilibrium in the dichotomy of many seemingly contradictory qualities between one extreme and another." By being aware of these seeming contradictions, a leader can "more easily balance the opposing forces and lead with maximum effectiveness." Here are the 12 main dichotomies of leadership Willink identifies as traits every effective leader should have.

Willink says a common misconception the public has about the military is that subordinates mindlessly follow every order they're given.

"But in another respect, a leader has everything to prove: Every member of the team must develop the trust and confidence that their leader will exercise good judgment, remain calm, and make the right decisions when it matters most." And the only way that can be achieved is through leading by example every day.

Whether you have issues with a co-worker or your boss, working in a toxic office setting is detrimental not only to your health and wellness, but your overall career.

"They must drive competition and push themselves and their teams to perform at the highest level," Willink writes.

"But they must never put their own drive for personal success ahead of overall mission success for the greater team." This means that when something does not go according to plan, leaders must set aside their egos and take ownership of the failure before moving forward.

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"But when it goes too far, overconfidence causes complacency and arrogance, which ultimately set the team up for failure," Willink writes.

Whoever's in charge can't waste time excessively contemplating a scenario without making a decision.

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