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LG&E and KU retired their Haefling #3 plant in 2013 after 43 years in operation – although retirement of natural gas plants is not the norm in Kentucky, per Mathews’ testimony.

And that’s not just a question of fuel price according to testimony from Mathews, who said the price of coal is steady.

That was the word from Kentucky Public Service Commissioner Talina Mathews, who told the Interim Joint Committee on Natural Resources and Energy today that coal generated 83 percent of Kentucky’s electricity in 2016, but preliminary data shows that percentage declined below 80 percent in 2017.

The new law will also allow breweries to sell one case per customer at fairs and festivals in wet jurisdictions. House Bill 187 will require the state Department of Education to make a “dyslexia toolkit” available to school districts to help them identify and instruct students who display characteristics of dyslexia. House Bill 1 will take steps to reform the state’s foster care and adoption system to ensure that a child’s time in foster care is limited and that children are returned to family whenever possible.

It will expand the definition of blood relative for child placement and ensure that children in foster care are reunified with family or placed in another permanent home in a timely manner. House Bill 84 will require coroners or medical examiners to release identifying and other relevant information about a deceased person to Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates if the person’s wish to be an organ donor is known and the body is suitable for medical transplant or therapy. House Bill 373 will exempt some police body camera footage from being publicly released.

She attributed most of that drop to the closure of the Paducah gaseous diffusion plant, a federal facility that produced enriched uranium until 2013.

But electricity consumption in Kentucky has been decreasing for much longer than 2013, Mathews said, with consumption steadily decreasing since 2008.

FRANKFORT—Assets in the Kentucky Retirement Systems have increased by 5 million so far this fiscal year with investment gains topping

The new law will also allow breweries to sell one case per customer at fairs and festivals in wet jurisdictions. House Bill 187 will require the state Department of Education to make a “dyslexia toolkit” available to school districts to help them identify and instruct students who display characteristics of dyslexia. House Bill 1 will take steps to reform the state’s foster care and adoption system to ensure that a child’s time in foster care is limited and that children are returned to family whenever possible.

It will expand the definition of blood relative for child placement and ensure that children in foster care are reunified with family or placed in another permanent home in a timely manner. House Bill 84 will require coroners or medical examiners to release identifying and other relevant information about a deceased person to Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates if the person’s wish to be an organ donor is known and the body is suitable for medical transplant or therapy. House Bill 373 will exempt some police body camera footage from being publicly released.

She attributed most of that drop to the closure of the Paducah gaseous diffusion plant, a federal facility that produced enriched uranium until 2013.

But electricity consumption in Kentucky has been decreasing for much longer than 2013, Mathews said, with consumption steadily decreasing since 2008.

FRANKFORT—Assets in the Kentucky Retirement Systems have increased by $905 million so far this fiscal year with investment gains topping $1 billion year to date, officials told the state’s pension oversight board yesterday.

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The new law will also allow breweries to sell one case per customer at fairs and festivals in wet jurisdictions. House Bill 187 will require the state Department of Education to make a “dyslexia toolkit” available to school districts to help them identify and instruct students who display characteristics of dyslexia. House Bill 1 will take steps to reform the state’s foster care and adoption system to ensure that a child’s time in foster care is limited and that children are returned to family whenever possible.It will expand the definition of blood relative for child placement and ensure that children in foster care are reunified with family or placed in another permanent home in a timely manner. House Bill 84 will require coroners or medical examiners to release identifying and other relevant information about a deceased person to Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates if the person’s wish to be an organ donor is known and the body is suitable for medical transplant or therapy. House Bill 373 will exempt some police body camera footage from being publicly released.She attributed most of that drop to the closure of the Paducah gaseous diffusion plant, a federal facility that produced enriched uranium until 2013.But electricity consumption in Kentucky has been decreasing for much longer than 2013, Mathews said, with consumption steadily decreasing since 2008.FRANKFORT—Assets in the Kentucky Retirement Systems have increased by $905 million so far this fiscal year with investment gains topping $1 billion year to date, officials told the state’s pension oversight board yesterday.

billion year to date, officials told the state’s pension oversight board yesterday.

KRS Executive Director David Eager told the Public Pension Oversight Board that the 5 million increase in assets is like “water in the bathtub,” with more flowing in than flowing out. Investment gains, while below last year’s total of nearly billion, should allow KRS to finish the fiscal year with over

KRS Executive Director David Eager told the Public Pension Oversight Board that the $905 million increase in assets is like “water in the bathtub,” with more flowing in than flowing out. Investment gains, while below last year’s total of nearly $2 billion, should allow KRS to finish the fiscal year with over $1 billion in new income, Eager said. Hopefully we’ll be up a little more than $1.1 billion by the end of the year.”Also showing promise are investment returns for KRS so far in fiscal year 2018, with returns for pension and insurance investments up 7.72 percent and 8.02 percent respectively.“It’s a pretty dire outlook.” He said he came to that conclusion as he explored how Kentucky could afford to build two proposed interstate bridges – in the next six years.One proposed bridge would create an Interstate 69 Ohio River crossing between Evansville and Henderson.“I think the most pressing problem is the efficiency gains out there,” Thomas said in reference to more fuel-efficient vehicles.He said the reduction in revenue gains is tied to continued efficiency gains.“We have a lot of growth in Kentucky and we got to take care of that because, without infrastructure, we won’t have the investments in manufacturing and other things we need here in Kentucky.” Thomas said he thinks it’s negligible because the 563 electric vehicles about 31,500 hybrids registered in Kentucky make up less than 1 percent of all vehicles licensed in the state.

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KRS Executive Director David Eager told the Public Pension Oversight Board that the $905 million increase in assets is like “water in the bathtub,” with more flowing in than flowing out. Investment gains, while below last year’s total of nearly $2 billion, should allow KRS to finish the fiscal year with over $1 billion in new income, Eager said. Hopefully we’ll be up a little more than $1.1 billion by the end of the year.”Also showing promise are investment returns for KRS so far in fiscal year 2018, with returns for pension and insurance investments up 7.72 percent and 8.02 percent respectively.

“It’s a pretty dire outlook.” He said he came to that conclusion as he explored how Kentucky could afford to build two proposed interstate bridges – in the next six years.

One proposed bridge would create an Interstate 69 Ohio River crossing between Evansville and Henderson.

“I think the most pressing problem is the efficiency gains out there,” Thomas said in reference to more fuel-efficient vehicles.

He said the reduction in revenue gains is tied to continued efficiency gains.

“We have a lot of growth in Kentucky and we got to take care of that because, without infrastructure, we won’t have the investments in manufacturing and other things we need here in Kentucky.” Thomas said he thinks it’s negligible because the 563 electric vehicles about 31,500 hybrids registered in Kentucky make up less than 1 percent of all vehicles licensed in the state.

billion in new income, Eager said. Hopefully we’ll be up a little more than

KRS Executive Director David Eager told the Public Pension Oversight Board that the $905 million increase in assets is like “water in the bathtub,” with more flowing in than flowing out. Investment gains, while below last year’s total of nearly $2 billion, should allow KRS to finish the fiscal year with over $1 billion in new income, Eager said. Hopefully we’ll be up a little more than $1.1 billion by the end of the year.”Also showing promise are investment returns for KRS so far in fiscal year 2018, with returns for pension and insurance investments up 7.72 percent and 8.02 percent respectively.“It’s a pretty dire outlook.” He said he came to that conclusion as he explored how Kentucky could afford to build two proposed interstate bridges – in the next six years.One proposed bridge would create an Interstate 69 Ohio River crossing between Evansville and Henderson.“I think the most pressing problem is the efficiency gains out there,” Thomas said in reference to more fuel-efficient vehicles.He said the reduction in revenue gains is tied to continued efficiency gains.“We have a lot of growth in Kentucky and we got to take care of that because, without infrastructure, we won’t have the investments in manufacturing and other things we need here in Kentucky.” Thomas said he thinks it’s negligible because the 563 electric vehicles about 31,500 hybrids registered in Kentucky make up less than 1 percent of all vehicles licensed in the state.

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KRS Executive Director David Eager told the Public Pension Oversight Board that the $905 million increase in assets is like “water in the bathtub,” with more flowing in than flowing out. Investment gains, while below last year’s total of nearly $2 billion, should allow KRS to finish the fiscal year with over $1 billion in new income, Eager said. Hopefully we’ll be up a little more than $1.1 billion by the end of the year.”Also showing promise are investment returns for KRS so far in fiscal year 2018, with returns for pension and insurance investments up 7.72 percent and 8.02 percent respectively.

“It’s a pretty dire outlook.” He said he came to that conclusion as he explored how Kentucky could afford to build two proposed interstate bridges – in the next six years.

One proposed bridge would create an Interstate 69 Ohio River crossing between Evansville and Henderson.

“I think the most pressing problem is the efficiency gains out there,” Thomas said in reference to more fuel-efficient vehicles.

He said the reduction in revenue gains is tied to continued efficiency gains.

“We have a lot of growth in Kentucky and we got to take care of that because, without infrastructure, we won’t have the investments in manufacturing and other things we need here in Kentucky.” Thomas said he thinks it’s negligible because the 563 electric vehicles about 31,500 hybrids registered in Kentucky make up less than 1 percent of all vehicles licensed in the state.

.1 billion by the end of the year.”Also showing promise are investment returns for KRS so far in fiscal year 2018, with returns for pension and insurance investments up 7.72 percent and 8.02 percent respectively.“It’s a pretty dire outlook.” He said he came to that conclusion as he explored how Kentucky could afford to build two proposed interstate bridges – in the next six years.One proposed bridge would create an Interstate 69 Ohio River crossing between Evansville and Henderson.“I think the most pressing problem is the efficiency gains out there,” Thomas said in reference to more fuel-efficient vehicles.He said the reduction in revenue gains is tied to continued efficiency gains.“We have a lot of growth in Kentucky and we got to take care of that because, without infrastructure, we won’t have the investments in manufacturing and other things we need here in Kentucky.” Thomas said he thinks it’s negligible because the 563 electric vehicles about 31,500 hybrids registered in Kentucky make up less than 1 percent of all vehicles licensed in the state.