dating customs in zimbabwe Professors dating students in college

To protect free speech, he said, we allow speech that is disagreeable and offensive.

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A 1997 paper by Barry Dank and Joseph Fulda indicates that: Starting in the 1980's, a feminist literature emerged calling for the banning of intimate, organizationally based, asymmetrical relationships and the subsumption of such relationships under the rubric of sexual harassment.Thus, when individuals in asymmetrical relationships engage in sexual behavior such a relationship is seen as sexual harassment with the person in the superordinate position viewed as the harasser and the person in the subordinate position as the victim.The UCLA College of Letters and Science and the university's 11 professional schools feature renowned faculty and offer more than 300 degree programs and majors.UCLA is a national and international leader in the breadth and quality of its academic, research, health care, cultural, continuing education and athletic programs."By what authority does the university become the arbiter of romantic etiquette among consenting adults?

I think the unspoken motivation is the concern that romance gone awry will lead to costly civil litigation.

The first no sex policy came in 1984, when Harvard banned relationships between faculty members and students they taught. In 1986 it adopted a very specific policy barring romantic or sexual relationships between faculty and their own students, but allowing relationships with students professors don’t specifically “teach or supervise.” Harvard Dean Henry Rosovsky, introducing the policy at his school, wrote that relationships between teachers and students were "always wrong." John Kenneth Galbraith, emeritus professor of economics at the school, publicly wondered how he, who had been married to a former graduate student for almost 50 years, should atone for his sins.

The dean replied, basically, that the Galbraiths had nothing to worry about because they had met and married back when "amour -- instructional and noninstructional -- was in fashion." So the relationships were "always wrong" except, well, in the 1930s, when they apparently weren’t at all wrong.

Should hospitals prevent doctors from being romantically involved with nurses?

Should law firms prohibit attorneys from dating law clerks and administrative assistants?

While there’s a troublesome power dynamic at work here—a tenure-track economics professor’s relationship with a freshman in his macroeconomics class, whose grade he determines, is obviously different from any relationship that student might develop with another economics professor; likewise, that freshman would have a different relationship with another freshman—nobody seemed to think this one was such a big deal. If a professor were to approach (or text message) a student today to ask for a date it would strike many as incredibly inappropriate. While it’s true that that UConn prohibition extends to any professors and any students of every gender, the traditional dynamic here is a male professor and a female student.