Radiometric dating uses the decay rates of

It is therefore essential to have as much information as possible about the material being dated and to check for possible signs of alteration.

Precision is enhanced if measurements are taken on multiple samples from different locations of the rock body.

For example, a study of the Amitsoq gneisses from western Greenland used five different radiometric dating methods to examine twelve samples and achieved agreement to within 30 Ma on an age of 3,640 Ma.Accurate radiometric dating generally requires that the parent has a long enough half-life that it will be present in significant amounts at the time of measurement (except as described below under "Dating with short-lived extinct radionuclides"), the half-life of the parent is accurately known, and enough of the daughter product is produced to be accurately measured and distinguished from the initial amount of the daughter present in the material.At a certain temperature, the crystal structure has formed sufficiently to prevent diffusion of isotopes.This temperature is what is known as closure temperature and represents the temperature below which the mineral is a closed system to isotopes.The procedures used to isolate and analyze the parent and daughter nuclides must be precise and accurate.

This normally involves isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

Additionally, elements may exist in different isotopes, with each isotope of an element differing in the number of neutrons in the nucleus.

A particular isotope of a particular element is called a nuclide. That is, at some point in time, an atom of such a nuclide will spontaneously transform into a different nuclide.

Alternatively, if several different minerals can be dated from the same sample and are assumed to be formed by the same event and were in equilibrium with the reservoir when they formed, they should form an isochron. In uranium-lead dating, the concordia diagram is used which also decreases the problem of nuclide loss.

Finally, correlation between different isotopic dating methods may be required to confirm the age of a sample.

In these cases, usually the half-life of interest in radiometric dating is the longest one in the chain, which is the rate-limiting factor in the ultimate transformation of the radioactive nuclide into its stable daughter.