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Starting in 1977, he and his brother, Tom (who triumphed over the disease), hosted the annual telethon, raising millions of dollars for the organization. In 2002, Ritter reconnected with network television audiences as the star of the ABC hit sitcom Ritter fell ill while filming an episode of the series on September 11, 2003, suffering chest pain, nausea and vomiting.

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He soon changed his major to Theater Arts, graduating in 1971 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in drama..

The premise of three attractive singles sharing an apartment in the '70s hit a chord with TV audiences, who fell in love with the goofy and accident-prone boy next door.

I’ve done everything I can – their wives must take it from here.

This might all seem like physical training (dishes, luggage, doors), but I believe what our sons are learning is that you, darling girl, deserve to be cared for, honored, respected, and loved. I guess it runs in the family, or maybe it just shows that no matter how noble our efforts, each of us is human and needs a Savior.

He attended Hollywood High School and the University of Southern California where he majored in Psychology and minored in Architecture.

After two years, however, he was persuaded to join a drama class taught by leading drama coach and actress Nina Foch.

8 Simple Rules is a comedy series staring John Ritter and Katy Segal.

The series was inspired by the book "Eight Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter," by W. Paul Hennessy is a stay at home father of three children, two teenage daughters and a preteen son. His wife, Cate, is a nurse and the "voice of reason" in the family.

(I have zero to prove about how “I can do everything a man can do.” I absolutely can’t, plus I’m often too busy doing so many of the less-heavy-but-equally-needed jobs around here.

So can the gentlemen get the luggage and carry the boxes and open the jars?

(Having four sons and a husband, it is a fact that I have not had to open a door for myself in so many years that I don’t even remember how to do this task.) My sons have learned to allow me to walk in ahead of them, to tell me “thank you” when I’ve done something for them (all day long, thank you very much), and to listen to me when I’m going into far greater detail and using many more words than they might prefer.